Shipping Container House Internal framing

Image

Shipping Container House Internal framing

Due to the Christmas break, we were unable to complete the deck as our supplier for the decking substructure was closed. We had to put the deck on hold so we began the timber framing of the top level. In preparation for this, we thoroughly cleaned out all of the fine metal particles caused by grinding when cutting open the internal container walls. To do this we swept the containers out and used the pressure washer.

One of the many differences in building a container house compared to a timber framed house was building a structure within a structure. One of our major considerations was how to secure the timber stud work to the container structure. To do this, we tek screwed 90x45mm pine MGP10 (softwood timber) to the upper part of the container wall sitting flush under the top rails of the container. This is called a waling plate. This solid fixing is where the top plate of the stud wall is nailed to. The bottom plate is nailed to the existing marine ply floor of the container. The waling place is also where the ceiling battens are fixed to (to span the width of the container and maximise ceiling height, we joined two lengths of 90x45mm timber side by side). To ensure a level ceiling and straight walls, we again used our very handy laser level.

The speed at which the carpenter can frame out is incredible and has really sped up the project. This is the first stage in the build where we have employed a trades person to carry out work. To assist, we have been cutting the timber ready so that he can keep building walls at a steady pace.

One of the most exciting points was the installation of a test window. We picked up our smallest window from the manufacturer to refine our method of window installation. We had to consider how the window would fit into the container wall and timber stud work. Other things to consider were weather proofing and positioning the window with the internal plasterboard and external cladding. It was very helpful working with an experienced carpenter to resolve this.

More updates coming soon!

 

Shipping Container House Cantilever deck construction

Image

Shipping Container House Cantilever deck construction

When it came to building the side deck, we decided to build a cantilever deck as opposed to a standard deck with supporting columns. This allowed for cleaner aesthetics and a column free walkway on the ground. We were fortunate to have orientated the containers the same way (doors all at one end) which allowed space in the steel cavity of the container for the beams to bolted in to.

We marked out all of the holes to be drilled and used a magnetic drill to drill the holes. This proved to be a much easier way to drill than using an electric hand drill. The electromagnet on the drill holds the position of the drill in the one location and allows holes to be quickly and accurately drilled. For each metre of cantilevered deck, 2 metres needed to be bolted to the substructure of the container. The bolts used are 12mm and are spaced 400mm apart. This allows for a very secure connection with minimal bounce.

Raising the beams into place proved harder than we’d imagined, however we soon got better at lifting them into place. Like many tasks in this project, with a few extra muscles at work, the task became easier. Once all bolted to the container structure, we painted the nuts, bolts and washers with a zinc rich spray paint to prevent corrosion.

We then roughed up the surface of the galvanized PFC beams and applied an etch primer using the spray gun and finally a top coat of paint.